Friday, December 13, 2019

Explore Update #6

Having still not gotten a response from the Maya app customer service, I used yesterday to organize my sources: put them into MLA format and assigned them numbers so that when I began my writing I could input my citations as I went. However, I do feel confident enough with the information I have gathered so far that I plan on starting my writing today and hopefully finishing it this weekend.

Thursday, December 12, 2019

Explore Update #5

Yesterday I spent most of my time trying to come up with a possible way to explain how the app works. I know that the data inputted by the user is compared to a database that was formed by doctors but I can't seem to find one source that clearly states that is what happens. I also do not know if the processing description needs to be more specific than that but I feel like it needs to include what software is used and I do not have that information. I am a little worried that I am far behind in the process so my goal for today is to start planning and constructing my writing so that I can wrap that up this weekend at home and begin composing my artifact soon.

Wednesday, December 11, 2019

Explore Update #4

Most of my work so far has been going smoothly except I am still really struggling to find how the app processes its data which is also a big factor of the function category. Yesterday I deeply explored the Maya website and searched the web for anything I could find about the science behind the app, but I was still left with nothing. I decided my best bet was to email the company and ask if they could direct me to a page explaining how the app works, and if they didn't if they could just explain it themselves. So far I have not received a response so I am going to keep digging and see if there is even the smallest bit of information I could use as a source. Yesterday I also downloaded the app myself so I could see for myself what data the app requests from a user and what information they feed back to the user. What I found was that Maya asks for sixty possible symptoms the user could be experiencing, and some of these symptoms become an output of the app because a handful are suggested to you based on where you are in your cycle. So while my inputs and outputs are fairly obvious, finding how that data is processed has become quite difficult.

Tuesday, December 10, 2019

Explore Update #3

I was able to accomplish finding several solid sources for cultural effects relating to beneficial effects of the Maya app, however I have not started to find any cultural/societal/economical for a harmful effect. While I tried to find good sources for the function of the app last class, I really struggled and I feel like I may have to really dig deep on the web to find what I am looking for. This class I hope to nearly finish my research so that I can begin writing soon.

Friday, December 6, 2019

Explore Update #2

Last class I accomplished establishing a negative effect for the Maya app. I struggled in the beginning to really decide on one that would work because I couldn't seem to find anything that would be an actual effect that wasn't intended (not just a design flaw). I'm very happy with the amount of sources I have collected so far. My plan for today is to work on finding a connection to culture, society, or economy. I already have an idea for a link to culture, but I would have to find a source to back up my claim.

Thursday, December 5, 2019

Explore update #1

Yesterday my main goal was to organize my folder and ideas so that when I started my research, everything I needed would be categorized and easy to access. So, I created three documents within my final explore folder: artifact planning, sources+research, and writing. Once everything was organized, I began to find sources and explore what the possible effects of the app could be. I also discovered that my original idea may not have been the best option; I was going to research the app Flo, but I found that the Maya app was under fire more for privacy issues. Once I had gathered a few sources about data privacy and purpose of Maya, my Ipad ran out of battery. I only had ten minutes left of class but I started to realize that I couldn't find any negative effects. With a pen and a piece of paper I started to brainstorm the possible negative effects of a women's health app. I was successful in coming up with a few ideas, and those are what I will be finding sources for today.

Wednesday, December 4, 2019

Ethical data collecting


I chose consent as the most important ethical data issue because for me, being in the generation I am, I think it’s the one that is disregarded the most. Snap chatting, scrolling through Tik Tok, and checking friends’ locations are daily activities for many teenagers nowadays. But these apps have major consent issues along with most social media apps; the majority of people don’t read the terms of service for a program and agree to them anyone, unknowingly giving these apps permission to do anything they want with personal data. Personally, I know I have fallen victim to this before, and I think it’s an important issue that needs more of my, and my generation’s, attention so that these apps do not continue to exploit information. One of my concerns with Snapchat is the scanning of the face to place a filter on an image. While I’m not sure if this information is verified, it is a fear of mine that I am unaware of what the app may do with that scan. This concerns relates to the article I chose about ethical data. The article spoke of Amazon’s facial recognition technology and how it “recognises, classifies, and tracks facial data on a continuous basis without consent or a defined number of subjects in each study/data collection project.” Perhaps the biggest issue with Amazon’s tactics is the fact that they use the facial recognition technology on unwilling participants, not even giving them the opportunity to mindlessly click an agree button. The reason behind their choice to scan unwilling participants is all about a race. The tech company with the most data, aka the most faces, will therefore have the best tech. This race raises a larger question: what does Amazon do with this data? Why, besides domination, would a company want the faces of everyone in the world? What happens to it without anyone knowing it’s been released?

Link to article

Monday, December 2, 2019

Submarine Cables

1.) Yes, sharks have had a history of biting the cables, however it is not one of the biggest threats to the cables, and it certainly is not a frequent event. 

2.) Anchors that are dragged across the cables are a common way for them to break along with damage from fishing vessels. Events like earthquakes and tsunamis can harm the cables and intended damage or damage caused by aquatic animals can occur but is not as frequent.

3.) People on the internet all over the world use submarine cables. This includes telecom carriers, mobile operators, multinational corporations, governments, content providers, and research institutions who use the cables to send data.

4.) Cables are about the thickness of a garden hose that has a few layers to increase it protection and durability. Some of these layers include silicon gel, copper sheath, and steel wires.

5.) One end of the cables fires lasers that are carried through the glass fibers to reach the receptors at the other end. 

6.) What interested me the most about these cables was the size of them. Before reading this document, I pictured very large and thick wires roughly the width of an oak tree. I figured that since the wires have such an important job that they'd need to be large to gain protection but because of technology, the cables do not need to be this size.

Wednesday, November 27, 2019

The Internet


1.) A protocol is a set of rules/expectations that allow trouble-less communication as long as everyone follows protocol.
2.) An IP address is a number organized in bits that correlates to a device within a network. These internet protocol addresses allow the destination (usually a website) to be reached. 
3.) An IP address contains 32 bits with 8 bits in each portion of the address. The first few digits of the address identify the regional network the device is in (although nowadays it is now just networks and sub networks). Next comes the subnetwork followed by the address of the device.
4.) There are 32 bits in an IPv4 address meaning that there can be (5.) 4 billion addresses.
6.)IPv6 differs from IPv4 in the amount of bits it uses and the amount of unique addresses it provides. IPv6 has 128 bits and 340 undecillion unique addresses. This increase in possible destinations is needed because the internet became more popular than what was expected when it was designed, and due to the growth we now need more unique addresses to reach more sites. 
7+8.) An IP packet has both the IP address and the data for the machine the address identified.
9.) DNS is used to look up domain names and get the IP address to direct the computer to the right destination. DNS servers are also divided into zones such as .org, .net, .com, etc. to organize and improve the efficiency of domain searching.

Monday, November 4, 2019

Three things I learned...

Fun Fact #1: There were 17 transmitters at the Marconi Center!
Fun Fact #2: One of the 17 transmitters at the Marconi Center ran for 20 years!
Fun Fact #3When messages were in the process of being sent they would require a lot of energy. This would occasionally lead to the flickering or dimming of lights in the center and in buildings around town.

Field Trip Picture #6 Second Building


This artifact shows no computational device, however it provides information on the means of communication for wireless operators. I chose this exhibit to photograph because I was shocked to hear that the operators would normally handle 500 messages daily. These are long Morse code messages... today I think I would get overwhelmed if I received 500 text messages a day.
Pictured is a small traffic rack with slots for the ships call signs to be read. Each ship was identified by one of the codes above like C6CN3 or C6DN. I found this interesting because I have always enjoyed puzzles, and this way of processing message from ships seems like one big puzzle.
Wireless communication is represented in this exhibit with the use of Morse code.

Explore Update #6

Having still not gotten a response from the Maya app customer service, I used yesterday to organize my sources: put them into MLA format and...